Welcome to Tunisian Crochet Week!

19 September, 2011

in Crocheting & Knitting

Tunisian crochet in progress

Dear Friends,

Welcome to Tunisian Crochet Week!

I have been all over this big wide internet Tunisian crochet world & feel like I have seen every picture and blop post out there.  I’m sure I haven’t, but I have looked at and read a lot.  Today is the beginning of a comprehensive resource list for your benefit as well as mine.

I find that Tunisian crochet seems to be gaining in popularity again, but unlike regular crochet or knitting, most of it’s resources seem like they are spread all over the place.  There are some great sites focusing on just Tunisian crochet, but even they don’t hit everything.

Sharon Silverman’s Tunisian Crochet Photo Gallery

You should go here first to expand your mind about what Tunisian crochet can look like and get a beginning idea of the variety of stitches that it offers.  She has about 10 or 11 different stitches represented here.  There are also 5 or 6 projects worked in the simple Tunisian crochet stitch with different yarns that show you the versitility of the basic stitch.  The photos are all from her book, Tunisian Crochet: The Look of Knitting with the Ease of Crocheting.

It’s the only photo gallery of it’s kind I’ve found so far.  Which is a shame.  (Even regular crochet and knitting don’t seem to have easy-to-find comprehensive photo galleries of the different stitches.  Why is this?  In my opinion, visual learning is one the best perks of the internet.)

Tunisian crochet, Afghan crochet or Tricot Crochet from Garnstudio Drops design on Vimeo.

Here’s the video that I watched to learn Tunisian Crochet. I like that it’s in a nice chunky yarn, so the stitches she’s making are really easy to see. I love, love, love starting & stopping videos to learn something!

And here’s a video for the lefties.

I am left-handed, but often forget to look to see if there’s a “custom” leftie thing for me. It’s your lot when you’re only 10% of the world’s population! It’s on the long side, but good. I’m thinking I may need to make a shorter one for impatient people like me.

Something to expand your mind and something to get you started!

More coming!! I’m trying to simultaneously break down & organize the info for you. Though some of it’s hard to find, I have more than I thought I did for you. Which is good!

Coming up: Tunisian Crochet stitch swatches I did, & what to do if you don’t have a Tunisian Crochet hook!

{ 26 comments… read them below or add one }

BobbiNo Gravatar

This is beautiful! I haven’t tried this stitch yet, but you are convincing me to try it:)

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

Yea! If you crochet or knit at all, it’s really quite easy – go for it! Give it a little swatch! :)

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Sharon SilvermanNo Gravatar

Thanks for posting my stitch samples, and for this great blog! Tunisian crochet is indeed alive and well. My next book, Crochet Scarves (publication summer 2012) has Tunisian and regular crochet patterns, as well as one in broomstick lace. I see Tunisian appearing more frequently in magazines, too. Good news for those of us who are fans of the craft.

(I wanted to call my first Tunisian book “Tunisian Crochet: It’s Not Just for Afghans Anymore” but the publisher balked!)

Keep up the great work. I hope to see you in Ravelry’s Tunisian group, and on my FB page, Sharon Silverman Contemporary Crochet.

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

Sharon, thank you so much for stopping by! I love your idea for the name of your book – how publishing decisions like titles and covers are made fascinates me. I look forward to checking out the Tunisian group on Ravelry & will find you on FB. Thanks, again!

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Anita RamirezNo Gravatar

Made the bargello tunisian afghan years ago. . Blues, lilacs purple, yello orange ande red on white background. Have lost my directions and graph scheme. Is it possible that you have it and could send it to me by snail mail. I won a grand first at the fair with this afghan and would like to write it for my granddaughter.
Let my how much you owe for your trouble. Is it possible that there is a crochet kit already made up that you could send me? Send me the price or catalog info.

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Della MaedaNo Gravatar

Is there a Tunisian stitch that looks the same on both sides?

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

Della,

Not that I know of, since it’s similar to knitting with both a forward and return pass. It can probably be done in the round like knitting so that you end up with a double thick fabric and the outside all the same. Sharon Silverman has a blog and books on Tunisian Crochet and Marie at the Underground Crafter blog is an excellent crocheter – you might ask them. Hope this helps!

Happy Making!

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Kim GuzmanNo Gravatar

If you work in double-ended Tunisian, it can look the same on each side because the work is turned on each row.

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

Thanks Kim! I’ll pass that along!

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IidaNo Gravatar

Hi! Totally love the colourful scarf you have on the right side of the page! Would it be possible to get a tutorial/link to a tutorial/pattern/anything for it?? I really wanna make one for myself as well, but I’m struggling with making it with two colours. I know how to do it with only one colour.. Not sure if I’m explaining myself properly, I hope you get it!

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RachaelNo Gravatar

I loooooooove the rainbow scarf on the right of the page also! Is there a pattern or tutorial for that? Thanks!!

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

Lida and Rachel,

I made it for CraftSanity Magazine Issue 5 and it is for sale here. I talk about the issue in this blog post and there’s also another photo of it.

I’m so glad you like my work! Thanks for stopping by!

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Paula RobinsonNo Gravatar

I’m just starting out on tunisian crochet and finding it difficult to find books with UK stitch terminology. I am slowly learning to work from US patterns in regular crochet, but it’s so easy when tired or lacking concentration to slip up and do the wrong stitches! It would be really helpful if publishers could state somewhere obvious (on cover or spine) whether a crochet book of any kind is using US or UK terminology. I wonder does anyone else have this problem?

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

Paula,

I’m sure people do! Putting the country on the spine is a great idea! I’m hoping that in our hyper-connected internet age, we’ll all eventually move towards using the international symbols and a global terminology. Though I’ve not seen symbols for Tunisian Crochet. I’m not sure if we have them?

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Julie RiouxNo Gravatar

I am doing the cowl from the craft sanity magazine. How do I hide the yarn that I have to pull over to start at the opposite end? I love the patterns, I am just a little confused. Thank you!

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

I’m emailing you!

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AshleyNo Gravatar

My tunisian stitch keeps curling. Am I doing something wrong or is that normal in the beginning?

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

Goodness no! That’s just how Tunisian Crochet is – very much like knitting. Blocking it at the end, and adding a border help. There’s a great post on chez crochet about that very topic here. Hope this helps! Let me know how it goes and thanks for stopping by!!

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RobinNo Gravatar

Hi Elizabeth
That last question from Ashly about Tunisian Crochet to stop curling ? That link dont work for me. Can you maybe send me another?

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ElizabethNo Gravatar
NoriNo Gravatar

HI I just wanted to ask about the wool used in the photo above, the second photo down, just above the link for the photo gallery. It looks like honeycomb stitch with a greyish wool with colour flecks and it’s so gorgeous I just want to buy some of that wool and try it!!! Do you know what the type/brand of wool is and if it, or something similar is available?
Thanks N

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ElizabethNo Gravatar

I’m sorry, I don’t, but you could try emailing Sharon Silverman, the crocheter who made that swatch and ask her.

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JodyNo Gravatar

Hi! I bought CraftSanity issue 5, which has two of your Tunisian patterns. I don’t feel sure whether I should cut the yarn and leave a tail at the end of each pass as I change colors. Don’t know how to chat on Twitter, but will see if I can learn. Can you help me here? Thanks!

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isabel freemanNo Gravatar

hi-found your blog/page great as I have just started to learn this new craft for me. I can do simple, plain, twisted stitch no problem but I wouldn’t be able to use it as its so stiff. Im using good quality yarn so I know its not that. There is just no stretch or movement with the resultant piece of material. Any help would be gratefully received!

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PollyNo Gravatar

Love how it comes together so fast and beautiful.

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DebNo Gravatar

do you have a Tunisian pattern called around the world, for left handed people. It starts off doing 1 square then chaining to start the next round of squares. the chain always starts the new row. It just goes round an round to the size you want you afghan to be Thank you for the help

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